rmmod – Remove the specified kernel module from the running kernel

The rmmod command is used to remove a specified kernel module from the running kernel. A kernel module is a piece of code that can be dynamically loaded and unloaded into the kernel at runtime. These modules can provide support for specific hardware devices or add new functionality to the kernel. The rmmod command is useful when you want to remove a module that is no longer needed or causing issues with the system.

Overview

The basic syntax for the rmmod command is as follows:

rmmod [options] module_name

Here, module_name is the name of the module that you want to remove. The rmmod command will remove the module from the running kernel, freeing up any resources that it was using.

Examples

To remove the nvidia module, you would use the following command:

rmmod nvidia

If the module is currently in use by another process, you may receive an error message. In this case, you can use the -f option to force the removal of the module:

rmmod -f nvidia

Specific use cases

The rmmod command is useful in a variety of situations. Some common use cases include:

  • Removing a module that is causing system instability or crashes
  • Unloading a module that is no longer needed or is taking up too much memory
  • Removing a module that is interfering with other system components

Options

The following table lists all available options for the rmmod command:

Option Description
-f Force the removal of the module, even if it is in use
-v Verbose output – display additional information about the removal process
-w Wait until the module is no longer in use before removing it
-h Display help information for the command

Troubleshooting tips

If you receive an error message when trying to remove a module with rmmod, it may be because the module is currently in use by another process. In this case, you can try using the -f option to force the removal of the module. However, be aware that this can cause system instability or crashes if the module is still needed by another component.

If you are unsure which module to remove, you can use the lsmod command to display a list of all loaded modules. This can help you identify which modules are currently in use and which ones can be safely removed.

Notes

  • Be careful when using the rmmod command, as removing the wrong module can cause system instability or crashes.
  • It is generally a good idea to backup important data before making any changes to the system, including removing kernel modules.
  • If you are unsure about how to use the rmmod command or which module to remove, consult the system documentation or seek assistance from a qualified Linux administrator.